Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Badges

Powered by Vanilla
Welcome to Harry Potter Forum! Below you will find many interesting threads and discussions. Enjoy.

Phineas · ✭✭✭✭✭

About

Username
Phineas
Joined
Visits
3,354
Last Active
Roles
Student
Points
1,915
Badges
27
Posts
1,979
  • The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies and LOTR Official Thread

    Compliment LotR, yes. Up to the standards of it, god no. They're not intended to be, that's what I'm saying. They tie together with expansion and future elements, sure, but they're intended to feel different. They are radically different in every way. It doesn't need to be up to the same standard. If Tolkein wrote Lord of the Rings first, and then wrote The Hobbit later, it'd be the same thing; Not gritty enough, not real enough, not living up to the same standard. You know, it's not...meant to be?
    I'm honestly just grateful these films were made at all, especially with Jackson at the helm. We know from the immense success of the Lord of the Rings that he's the right guy for the job and I don't think it's a bad thing that his vision for the prequel, which is a fairy tale, is coming off this way. But that doesn't mean it has to be up to the same snuff as the Lord of the Rings. Everything in Lord of the Rings is bigger than The Hobbit, book and film. The characters, the plot, the scale. They tell a different story, and no matter how you paint it, the Lord of the Rings is the one that comes out on top. The liberties Jackson has taken on the elements of the book of The Hobbit in order to better tie it in to the Lord of the Rings are a betterment, to be honest. I don't see him has 'trying to make it an epic' to compliment LotR. I see him taking the incredibly whimsical source material and giving us something that, on screen, we might actually be interested in. Sure, these films are from the same universe, and yes, they are radically different. You're right in that The Hobbit does not suit an epic, which is exactly why it isn't gritty and real like the Lord of the Rings was, and has received the stylised visuals and the treatment it has been given by Jackson and his team.
    Just my two cents.
    Post edited by Phineas on
  • The Amazing Spider-Man 2

    Well, I think it both seems like a lot, and not very much at all. We're all here going 'They're showing too much of the film', and I suppose they are, but then again, they're only showing a few extended sequences. Most of what we see in the trailer are jumbled up shots only a second long each, if that. So what we've seen is pretty scattered. The scary part is that they've shown six accumulative minutes of that.

    Though there are things we probably didn't need to see, like the Goblin. A HINT of the Goblin would've been good, like in The Dark Knight trailer, that one shot of Harvey's face in the oil. It didn't explicitly show Two-Face at all, but we all knew it was coming. Then again, maybe there will be events in the film that they are keeping a secret, so the arrival of the Goblin pales in comparison. Who knows?
  • The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies and LOTR Official Thread

    But if your name is not Adam...why would you assume it's you?
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron

    You know your petitions will amount to absolutely nothing, right? Because film producers have so much more to do than care about petitions. They don't give fans what they want to see. They give them what they want the fans to see. I can see you're one of those people who are 'A petition for this! A petition for that! Petitions everywhere!'. In the world of cinema and film production, these things don't work. If you can't get a bunch of nerds on a nerd forum to sign, how do you expect a producer to care?
  • Rate/Review the Last Movie or TV Show You Watched

    I can't get over how much I loved the Joker in this game. Everything about him, especially his redesign. He has a much greater range in his facial expressions, which are properly frightening. He feels much more real, as opposed to his model in Asylum and City, which felt kind of plastic and uncanny.